The Wrong Side Of The Tracks

Most of us have heard someone – often our parents, but probably more often a character in a TV show – describing another individual as being “from the wrong side of the tracks”.

It is one we hear, and repeat, without necessarily giving any thought to what it means. We as humans, have a tendency to do that – but what does it mean?

Well, to make a long story short, it was realized some time ago that people who could afford to choose where they lived would pay for a house in a location that was peaceful, clean and sedate.

Too much through traffic means a lot of pollution, and can also cause structural faults, and also an increased number of strangers – something we were always taught to dread.

Poorer neighborhoods, with higher crime rates and naturally a “less desirable” kind of person living there, as a result, were often positioned close to public transport links such as railways and (in larger cities) airports.

Anyone living in that area would be considered bad news by the richer families who intended to maintain a spotless reputation – and if the son or daughter of a rich was seen to be consorting with someone from those areas, that could mean social suicide.

This kind of reputation still persists for many people. However, there are also advantages to living and buying in what might be considered a poorer, grottier neighborhood. Prices are lower, but sound investment does mean that you can still make a decent profit. After all, proximity to public transport links also has its benefits.

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